SCVFD Receives Gift

“Thin Red Line” SCVFD Oak Flag

Thanks goes out to Appalachian Rtistry and Working Hands For Christ Missions for this stunning Oak “Thin Red Line Flag” gift.  This beautiful piece now hangs in our dayroom as a testament to all those who hold the “Thin Red Line”. Company 20 responded to a vehicle fire of one of the mission team’s vehicles while they were returning home from a mission trip in our state. 

Want to learn more about your community volunteer fire department and its citizen volunteers? Then check out our ABOUT STAR CITY VFD PAGE. Want to learn more about becoming a citizen volunteer and helping the residents of Monongalia County? Visit our MEMBERSHIP and RECRUITMENT pages.

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8/31/2018: Vehicle Fire I-68W @ 9.5mm

8/31/2018: Company 20 was alerted to assist Co. 14, 12, 16 and Tanker 172 with a fully involved tractor trailer on I-68W in the area of the 9.5 mile marker. 

Want to learn more about your community volunteer fire department and its citizen volunteers? Then check out our ABOUT STAR CITY VFD PAGE. Want to learn more about becoming a citizen volunteer and helping the residents of Monongalia County? Visit our MEMBERSHIP and RECRUITMENT pages.

And as always, ‘LIKE’ us on FACEBOOK and follow us on INSTAGRAM by searching ‘starcityvfd’

Mountainfest 2018

Star City Fire & EMS had the privilege of providing primary Fire and EMS coverage for MountainFest 2018. Special thanks to Wilderness VFD in Nicholas County for the use of their side by side and Nathan Cogar from Serious Diesel Performance for the use of his Mini-Truck.

Want to learn more about your community volunteer fire department and its citizen volunteers? Then check out our ABOUT STAR CITY VFD PAGE. Want to learn more about becoming a citizen volunteer and helping the residents of Monongalia County? Visit our MEMBERSHIP and RECRUITMENT pages.
And as always, ‘LIKE’ us on FACEBOOK and follow us on INSTAGRAM by searching ‘starcityvfd’

5/28/2018: Tree Down with Electrical Hazard (Canyon Road)

Company 20 assisted Company 14 with traffic control and tree removal for ‘tree down with electrical hazard’. After MonPower secured electrical utilities Company 20 and 14 and MonPower units removed the hazardous tree and reopened the road to normal traffic.

Want to be a part of our organization and help the citizens of Monongalia County in the process? We’d love to meet you and are always looking for new members of our fire department family. Visit our RECRUITMENT page for more information. From all of us at The Star City Volunteer Fire Department and EMS divisions we hope you have a blessed Memorial Day weekend.

And as always, “LIKE” us on FACEBOOK and follow us on INSTAGRAM by searching ‘starcityvfd’

5/25/2018: 2 Vehicle MVC with fire (Point Marion Road)

Company 20, 14 and 12 toned for two vehicle head-on type collision on Point Marion Road. Call was upgraded to ‘MVC with fire’ while en-route.

Want to be a part of our organization and help the citizens of Monongalia County in the process? We’d love to meet you and are always looking for new members of our fire department family. Visit our RECRUITMENT page for more information.

And as always, “LIKE” us on FACEBOOK and follow us on INSTAGRAM by searching ‘starcityvfd’

 

 

WVU Kids Safety & Fitness Expo at WVU CPASS

(Pictured LEFT to RIGHT): Ryan Gillespie / Tyler Anderson / Ethan Bailey / Joe McVey / Joe Klass

Earlier this evening, members from Company 20 attended the annual WVU Kids Safety & Fitness Expo. Both kids and adults were shown Engine 209, its equipment, and were given information about the fire service and fire safety. Special thanks to WVU for inviting us to this event!

And as always, ‘LIKE’ us on FACEBOOK and follow us on INSTAGRAM by searching ‘starcityvfd’

5/18/2018 – Reported Structure Fire: Trinity High School

Companies 20, 12, 14 and Tanker 172 were alerted to a reported structure fire at Trinity High School in Co. 12’s area. Engine 201 and 209 responded and once on scene were tasked by Incident Command with accessing the “C” side FDC connection and sending units to enter from the building’s side “C” to investigate the smoke condition. Crews determined that a faulty HVAC unit motor on the structure’s roof had failed, overheated and caused the structure to fill with smoke through the duct work. Once the source of the smoke had been determined and no active fire condition was present Incident Command released Co.20 units to return to service while other units ventilated the structure.

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“STOP THE BLEED”

How to Stop the Bleed

Call 9-1-1

  • Call 9-1-1 yourself

OR

  • Tell someone to call 9-1-1
  • Ensure Your Safety
  • Before you offer any help, you must ensure your own safety!
  • If you become injured, you will not be able to help the victim.
  • Provide care to the injured person if the scene is safe for you to do so.
  • If, at any time, your safety is threatened, attempt to remove yourself (and the victim if possible) from danger and find a safe location.
  • Protect yourself from blood-borne infections by wearing gloves, if available.

Look for Life-Threatening Bleeding

  • Find the source of bleeding
  • Open or remove the clothing over the wound so you can clearly see it. By removing clothing, you will be able to see injuries that may have been hidden or covered.
  • Look for and identify “life-threatening” bleeding. Examples include:
    • Blood that is spurting out of the wound.
    • Blood that won’t stop coming out of the wound.
    • Blood that is pooling on the ground.
    • Clothing that is soaked with blood.
    • Bandages that are soaked with blood.
    • Loss of all or part of an arm or leg.
    • Bleeding in a victim who is now confused or unconscious.

Compress and Control

Key Point

There are a number of methods that can be used to stop bleeding and they all have one thing in common—compressing a bleeding blood vessel in order to stop the bleeding.

If you don’t have a trauma first aid kit:

Direct PressureApply direct pressure on the wound (Cover the wound with a clean cloth and apply pressure by pushing directly on it with both hands)

  1. Take any clean cloth (for example, a shirt) and cover the wound.
  2. If the wound is large and deep, try to “stuff” the cloth down into the wound.
  3. Apply continuous pressure with both hands directly on top of the bleeding wound.
  4. Push down as hard as you can.
  5. Hold pressure to stop bleeding. Continue pressure until relieved by medical responders.

If you do have a trauma first aid kit:

For life-threatening bleeding from an arm or leg and a tourniquet is NOT available OR for bleeding from the neck, shoulder or groin:

  • Pack (stuff) the wound with a bleeding control (also called a hemostatic) gauze, plain gauze, or a clean cloth and then apply pressure with both hands
  1. Open the clothing over the bleeding wound. (A)
  2. Wipe away any pooled blood.
  3. Pack (stuff) the wound with bleeding control gauze (preferred), plain gauze, or clean cloth. (B)
  4. Apply steady pressure with both hands directly on top of the bleeding wound. (C)
  5. Push down as hard as you can.
  6. Hold pressure to stop bleeding. Continue pressure until relieved by medical responders.

Packing the Wound

For life-threatening bleeding from an arm or leg and a tourniquet is available:

  • Apply the tourniquet
  1. Wrap the tourniquet around the bleeding arm or leg about 2 to 3 inches above the bleeding site (be sure NOT to place the tourniquet onto a joint—go above the joint if necessary).
  2. Pull the free end of the tourniquet to make it as tight as possible and secure the free end. (A)
  3. Twist or wind the windlass until bleeding stops. (B)
  4. Secure the windlass to keep the tourniquet tight. (C)
  5. Note the time the tourniquet was applied. (D)

Note: A tourniquet will cause pain but it is necessary to stop life-threatening bleeding.

Using a Tourniquet

Instructions and photos have been taken from the Save a Life booklet. Download the booklet for additional information on how to stop the bleed.

Pons PT, Jacobs L. Save a life: What everyone should know to stop bleeding after an injury. Chicago, IL: American College of Surgeons; 2016.